KatKnap Photo Tutorial: Extended Tunisian Simple Stitch (ETSS)

Photo Tutorial (ETSS)

You've mastered The Tunisian Simple Stitch. It was exhilarating to learn a new crochet skill, and then you put your skills to the test with the Tunisian Simple Stitch Fingerless Gloves pattern. You're hooked, so now what? A reasonable next step, is the Extended Tunisian Simple Stitch (also sometimes called the Tunisian Extended Stitch).

The Extended Tunisian Simple Stitch is abbreviated ETSS, and I was unable to locate a symbol used to denote this stitch in a diagram.

IMPORTANT NOTE:
A misunderstanding that I have witnessed across the internet is mistaking the Extended Tunisian Simple Stitch as an alias for the Tunisian Double Crochet. This is not so! The Tunisian Double Crochet will be covered in a separate post, but know for now that these stitches are not interchangeable!

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What's The Difference?

The first major difference between the ETSS and the Tunisian Simple Stitch (TSS) is the almost-inconspicuous little loop at the bottom of the vertical bar. This loop is created by working a chain on each stitch during the forward pass of the stitch. The second major difference is this: at the beginning of each reverse pass for the ETSS, there will be a chain 2 as opposed to the chain 1 that is created during the reverse pass of the TSS. The final difference between the ETSS and the TSSis that immediately following the reverse pass, there is then a chain 1 to start the next forward pass.

The Foundation Row

First and foremost, go ahead and create your foundation chain. Click the picture if you need a quick tutorial. 

First and foremost, go ahead and create your foundation chain. Click the picture if you need a quick tutorial. 

During your forward pass, as you pull loops up through the chain and reserve them to your hook, yarn over, and pull through one time to create a chain around each loop that is reserved on your hook. 

During your forward pass, as you pull loops up through the chain and reserve them to your hook, yarn over, and pull through one time to create a chain around each loop that is reserved on your hook. 

Your completed forward pass should look something like this. 

Your completed forward pass should look something like this. 

With all of the loops now reserved on your hook, you will create the ch2.

With all of the loops now reserved on your hook, you will create the ch2.

Continue with the reverse pass as normal (yo, pull through 2 loops all the way across), and the completed reverse pass will look like this, with a vertical bar (a.) and a small loops around the bottom of the vertical bar (b.)

Continue with the reverse pass as normal (yo, pull through 2 loops all the way across), and the completed reverse pass will look like this, with a vertical bar (a.) and a small loops around the bottom of the vertical bar (b.)

Here, work a ch1. This will complete the foundation row and begin the next forward pass. 

Here, work a ch1. This will complete the foundation row and begin the next forward pass. 

Next Forward and Reverse Pass

The only difference between how the foundation row and the following rows are worked, is that for the remainder of the project, the stitches would be created by pulling up loops from behind the vertical bar. 

Insert the hook behind the vertical bar to pull up your loops, then ch1 between each loop. 

Insert the hook behind the vertical bar to pull up your loops, then ch1 between each loop. 

With all but one loop on the hook, work a ch2 into the top of the previous ch2 stitch.

With all but one loop on the hook, work a ch2 into the top of the previous ch2 stitch.

Ch 2, then complete another reverse pass. (Yo, pull through two loops on the hook until one loop remains on the hook.)

Ch 2, then complete another reverse pass. (Yo, pull through two loops on the hook until one loop remains on the hook.)

swatch

Those simple changes to a Tunisian Simple Stitch create a more flexible fabric with the Extended Tunisian Simple Stitch.

Did you find this tutorial helpful?
Do you have a favorite Tunisian Stitch, or maybe there is one that you would like to see in a tutorial like this? I would love to hear from you!

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